Unlimited Toast

To Bohemia and Back

November 20th, 2009 · No Comments

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Rachelle is being studious and working on her research paper at the moment, but my brain couldn’t handle any more refugee law. Blog writing is far more attractive then doing homework late on a Friday night anyway. Last Friday at this time though we were in Prague. We were up before the sun (we’ve done that far too many times this semester) that morning and on a bus to the Czech Republic by 6:45. We drove through the old border control station not too far outside of Vienna and then finally arrived in Prague around 1 in the afternoon. We had a city tour to orient ourselves after checking into our hotel (where Rachelle and I discovered, to our amusement, that we had the handicapped room), and it was only a matter of minutes into the tour that we all fell in love with Prague. It’s a city full of many different architectural styles (City of a Thousand Spires) with a history that hits you over the head while you’re walking around. We all crossed the Charles Bridge and rubbed a certain statue, a gesture we were told guarantees that we will make it back to Prague one day. There was a market going on in the Old Town Square that we wandered through before heading back to the hotel room and watching American TV dubbed in German while getting ready for dinner. We don’t have much access to TV here in Salzburg, so it was pretty funny to see actors we recognized speaking with what were obviously not their own voices. Dinner was provided for us at, oddly enough, a place called Al Capone Restaurant. We had schnitzel. Austrian food in an Italian-American restaurant in Prague. It really is a small world. We went out after dinner and some of my friends decided to embrace Czech culture by embracing absinthe. Wise decision? Probably not. But there are some interesting pictures of them all attempting to light sugar on fire before drinking it.

The next morning some of us girls met up with a friend of Kirsten’s who was studying in Prague for the semester. She and a friend took it upon themselves to show us the ins and outs of the city, and they played the role of tour guides rather well. We were up early enough to witness Prague covered in a mist so thick that from the middle of the bridge you couldn’t see either shore. The girls took us up the many flights of stairs to Prague Castle (because what is a trip without climbing a mountain I ask you?) which is more of cathedral within a walled compound then a castle, but cool nonetheless. Had the fog not been determined to obstruct the seeing of anything more than two feet in front of you, the views from the hill would have been gorgeous. The castle gardens weren’t open and the cathedral was holding mass so we couldn’t get inside either of them, but all the more reason to make it back to Prague. We walked around more of the city, eventually coming to Lennon’s Wall, a section of wall graffitied over and over again with Beatle’s lyrics, peace signs, and names. It started as a means to convey anti-communist sentiments but has sense evolved into a general expression of peace, love, and all that jazz. Kind of cool to see the things people had scribbled on it. Not too far from the wall was a fence where couples wrote their names on a lock before clamping it to the fence and tossing the key into the river beneath. A bit melodramatic for my taste, but it makes for a cool collection of locks. After yet more exploring we came to the vegetarian restaurant that the girls had made reservations at for lunch. It’s become one of their favorite places to eat in the city, and after lunch it was easy to see why. We were excited to find cheddar cheese on the menu (Gouda’s great and all, but Austria doesn’t know what it’s missing with it’s lack of cheddar) and discovered a new taste for hot apple juice. The girls studying in Prague are also AIFS students, so it was fun to compare and contrast our experiences with the same program but in different cities. It seems a lot of us who ended up in Salzburg had at some point considered studying in Prague, but, as much as I loved it, Salzburg is so much of a home now that it’s hard to imagine spending the semester anywhere else. We said goodbye to our tour guides shortly after lunch, leaving us with time on our hands and not much of a plan. We settled for pretending to do homework while actually watching further strange German television. We ate dinner that night at the market in the square, where we ordered something we had at first thought to be some sort of snazzy Czech pizza but which turned out to be deep-fried dough with ketchup, garlic, and cheese. Interesting, and, we all agreed, really not very good. But we ate it anyway. We people watched in the square for a while, and soaked in the city a bit.
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It was an early night though because it was an early start yet again on Sunday. We traded the big city environment of Prague for the small, medieval Czech town of Český Krumlov about 30 km from the Austrian border. The entire town has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, quite the feat considering that twenty years ago it was falling apart under communism. It was a cute town, “crooked” as our tour guide called it, full of colorful old houses and narrow streets.
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We ate lunch at a tiny little sandwich shop and then spent the rest of our Czech currency on an odd Czech dessert that consists of rings of fried dough coated in sugar and cinnamon. Yum. Though of course, in true Czech style, the line took forever, and we then had to run to catch the bus. It was worth it.

We got back into Salzburg around dinner time. The rest of our week passed fairly uneventfully. The homework is piling up, so many of us have spent quite a bit of time holed up in our rooms attempting to finish assignments. In our Austrian Culture class on Tuesday our teacher invited a man who had grown up in California but who moved to Salzburg as an adult 27 years ago to come in to talk to us about the differences between Austria and the US. He rambled a bit, and he of course hasn’t lived in the States for a time longer than we’ve all been alive, but his perspective was interesting. I was especially amused when he, the native English speaker, had to stop a few times and ask our professor, the native German speaker, what the English word for certain things was. Just goes to show if you don’t use a language you lose it.

Wednesday and Thursday the excitement built in Salzburg over the imminent arrival of Cameron Diaz and Tom Cruise who are filming a movie here over the next few days. One girl in our group has reported a Cameron Diaz sighting, but they’ve fenced off most of the movie set so hers may be the first and last. We went ice skating at the newly set up outdoor ice rink in the old town Wednesday night, and though our feet were sore by the end of the evening, Rachel, Rachelle, and I had a lot of fun. And the Christmas markets started here this week as well, so we’ve all been slowly getting into the holiday spirit, though the oddly warm weather isn’t helping too much. We have four different markets, each with a slightly different flair to them, and I’m sure we’ll be spending quite a bit of time Christmas shopping and pasty eating at all four of them. Some of us put on our dirndls today to go wander the markets, only to find ourselves the unintentional stars of the place. We had a number of Austrians comment on our outfits, and a number of Americans ask us what we were wearing and why. A bit more hard to swallow was the angry Austrian man who yelled at us for daring to wear flip flops, sneakers, and sandals with our dresses. We didn’t bring our whole closets with us, so our shoe choices are rather limited, but that shook us up a bit, and our enthusiasm for wearing our dresses and taking fun Salzburg pictures dwindled (we did, however, have people taking pictures of us. Tourists are weird.)

My parents and sister are coming tomorrow (in fact, I believe their plane is probably in the air by now), which is crazy because it feels like it was just yesterday that they finally committed to coming to visit. I’m meeting them at the Salzburg train station in the afternoon, and it will be fun to show them all the places I’ve explored over the past two months. Now if only all of my homework was done…

Tags: Salzburg 09

Surviving Classes and Oktoberfest

October 3rd, 2009 · 2 Comments

As friends back at home studied for midterms, us AIFS kids in Salzburg finally got around to starting classes this past Monday. Classes are sort of strange in that our schedules are all over the place, with some classes being early, some late, some once a week, and some twice a week but at different times and/or in different places. Strange. I’m crazy enough that I’m facing three independent study courses this semester, so I have three fairly large research papers due in December. My time management skills shall be tested as I attempt to get all of that work done, plus other schoolwork, while still traveling and just being in Salzburg. We’ll see how that goes. But really, all of my classes (all political science and history courses) ought to be very interesting, especially as taught from the European perspective. But one class on Tuesday evening somehow took it upon itself to test my fear of heights as well. Immediately after class had ended around 6:45, all of the lights in the building went out, and a group of us discovered the front door was locked from the inside. The building had closed for the night with us still inside. So, being the resourceful/completely moronic students we are, a few of us decided the best way to get out of the building was to climb through a second story window and jump down to the sidewalk below. In full view of the main street and the people waiting at a nearby bus stop, we did just that. A few minutes later we discovered the rest of our group had calmly walked through the unlocked backdoor. Duh.

During the week we continued to find time for fun stuff in between the schoolwork and the ill-advised escapes. Wednesday morning we went for a pastry tasting event that left all of us in sugar comas. We drank hot chocolate and stuffed ourselves with generously-sized free samples of five different Austrian pastries, all of which were wonderful. I hardly ate for the rest of the day. That is, until much later that night when Kirsten was lovely enough to cook dinner for several of us at her homestay apartment. We squished ourselves around the table and had a fun few hours of eating and laughing, even after the light in the living room went out and we found ourselves eating by candelight. Thursday consisted largely of homework, capped off with karaoke night at the local Irish pub. Always an experience.

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On Friday (we only have classes Monday-Thursday) we woke up early and got on the train to Munich. We wound our way through rainy Bavaria until we got to the main train station in Munich and started our tour with Andreas, the same entertaining tour guide who had us climbing mountains during our Salzburg tour weeks ago. He showed us many of the major sites of the city, including the old Nazi parade grounds, the Residenz, and the Frauenkirche. We made it to Marienplatz at exactly noon, so we were just in time to see the glockenspiel play and witness the Bavarian knight knock out his French opponent just as he does high up in the clock tower everyday. We ate lunch at a market that sold everything from pretzels to horse meat, and then Andreas took a handful of us to a store that sells reasonably priced Tracht, traditional Bavarian/Austrian clothing. We had been drooling over all of the brightly colored dirndl dresses at the Salzburg festival for days, so some us were super excited to buy one of our own. Probably ridiculous, and probably something I’ll be hard pressed to find an excuse to wear once I’m back at home, but they’re coming back into fashion over here (as are lederhosen, which some of the guys bought as well), and they were fun to wear around in Munich all day and will be fun to wear here in Salzburg over the next few months. Though I do feel a bit like Little Bo Peep in it. Finally dressed like we belonged there, we then set out find Oktoberfest. We followed the crowds to a huge festival grounds full of carnival rides, games, food stands, souvenir stalls, and of course the requisite beer tents that went on forever. There were so many people that we never did find a place to sit inside a building. We did sit outside for a while though, and it is very surreal to have been a part of such a massive international cultural event. We caught the 9:48 train back to Salzburg having successfully avoided leaving any member of our group of friends asleep on park benches or in the clutches of some drunken Polish creepster, a feat I had deemed improbable at the start of the day. Long, long day, but one brimming with amusing events. This weekend we all have homework staring us in the face, but there is a special event at Salzburg’s museums tonight that we’re going to try and check out. Next weekend Croatia!

Tags: Salzburg 09